OUR SUSTAINABILITY

WE STRIVE TO BE GOOD STEWARDS OF THE OCEAN AND TO IMPROVE LIVELIHOODS IN THE COMMUNITIES WHERE WE WORK.
I
Accountability and transparency
At Sitka Salmon Shares, we believe that sustainable food systems are built on the principles of accountability and transparency. Many of our members come to us because they know our current seafood system is broken—filled with rampant fraud, poor-quality fish, and, frankly, deceit. Almost monthly, a new study appears that suggests that somewhere between 20 and 60 percent of U.S. fish is mislabeled. This is a moral and ethical failure, produced by an opaque system that seizes opportunities to put profits ahead of the health of consumers and fishermen alike. We don't believe that this type of system is sustainable, which is why we commit ourselves to educating our members about the process of harvesting and distributing their fish. We most often do this through emails, social media, and newsletters, but we also bring our fishermen to the Midwest. Having our fishermen here allows our members to get even closer to the source of their food. This type of transparency makes our fishermen and our members more accountable to one another. Our members gain a better understanding of the challenges of small-boat fishing, and in turn, our fishing families produce the type of fish that can only come from knowing the end user.
II
Community is more than commerce
At Sitka Salmon Shares, we believe that resilient (some might say stubborn) communities are the bedrock of a healthy, sustainable food system. This understanding goes back more than a century to when farmers on the Great Plains organized as the Grangers to advocate for better prices for their crops. Today, this type of thinking is directly tied to the Community Supported Agriculture and Fishery movements. We are deliberate about building communities of consumers in the Midwest that will allow traditional fishing communities in Alaska to continue to thrive. The communities we establish in the Midwest encourage new opportunities for neighbors, colleagues, family, and friends to convene and connect. We do our part by creating videos, hosting dinners, BBQs, and cooking classes, and writing newsletters. Our fishermen travel to meet our members and we even have trip contests for our members to travel to Sitka to further build these ties.
II
Community is more than commerce
At Sitka Salmon Shares, we believe that resilient (some might say stubborn) communities are the bedrock of a healthy, sustainable food system. This understanding goes back more than a century to when farmers on the Great Plains organized as the Grangers to advocate for better prices for their crops. Today, this type of thinking is directly tied to the Community Supported Agriculture and Fishery movements. We are deliberate about building communities of consumers in the Midwest that will allow traditional fishing communities in Alaska to continue to thrive. The communities we establish in the Midwest encourage new opportunities for neighbors, colleagues, family, and friends to convene and connect. We do our part by creating videos, hosting dinners, BBQs, and cooking classes, and writing newsletters. Our fishermen travel to meet our members and we even have trip contests for our members to travel to Sitka to further build these ties.
III
Fairness to Fishermen
At Sitka Salmon Shares, the fish you eat has been individually caught and processed by one of our fishermen-owners or partner fishermen (who we hope are on their way to ownership!). Our fishermen ownership program makes us distinct from the competition and intertwines the success of the company and our fishermen in important ways. They’re a key part of, not apart from, our business, and hold important leadership roles in the company. Our fishermen received an average of 10-30 percent more for their harvest, which can equate to $10,000 extra income in a given season. Many small-scale fishermen are often living on thin margins and fish for a living because of the way of life it affords them, not because they are getting rich! Our model helps create a more just system that values the hard work, high quality fish, and low-impact harvesting methods that help bring you some of the best protein on the planet.
IV
Healthy fish and habitat
At Sitka Salmon Shares, we understand that the world is facing declining wild fish populations—a consequence largely tied to habitat degradation, pollution, and overfishing. That’s why our fish come from sustainable fisheries in Alaska and are caught using fishing methods that minimize negative ecological impacts. You’ll never find a fish from us caught with high impact trawl or bottom trawl gear. Moreover, Alaska’s sustainable fisheries management system is the envy of the world. Management in Alaska relies on strict, science-based catch limits to ensure that populations are managed for their long-term health. Additionally, our fishermen and the Company are as concerned about climate change as you are. While seafood is among the most climate friendly proteins, we do our part to mitigate our own footprint by purchasing carbon offsets, which are put towards wind energy research and development efforts here in the Midwest. We also return 1 percent of our gross revenue annually to efforts to promote small-scale fisheries and fisheries conservation in Alaska, including donating to causes like the Alaska Wild Salmon Fund.
IV
Healthy fish and habitat
At Sitka Salmon Shares, we understand that the world is facing declining wild fish populations—a consequence largely tied to habitat degradation, pollution, and overfishing. That’s why our fish come from sustainable fisheries in Alaska and are caught using fishing methods that minimize negative ecological impacts. You’ll never find a fish from us caught with high impact trawl or bottom trawl gear. Moreover, Alaska’s sustainable fisheries management system is the envy of the world. Management in Alaska relies on strict, science-based catch limits to ensure that populations are managed for their long-term health. Additionally, our fishermen and the Company are as concerned about climate change as you are. While seafood is among the most climate friendly proteins, we do our part to mitigate our own footprint by purchasing carbon offsets, which are put towards wind energy research and development efforts here in the Midwest. We also return 1 percent of our gross revenue annually to efforts to promote small-scale fisheries and fisheries conservation in Alaska, including donating to causes like the Alaska Wild Salmon Fund.