Your guide to wild Pacific salmon

From Feast and Field

Your guide to wild Pacific salmon

Marsh Skeele, founder and vice president of Sitka Salmon Shares, recently shared his expert salmon knowledge with Feast and Field — storytellers sharing unique tales of people across the country who are growing, processing, and producing our food.

Marsh explains the five types of wild Pacific salmon while offering cooking tips that will make your mouth water.

King or chinook salmon can grow over 50 pounds and offer the fattiest and thickest fillets, making them ideal as a main dish, eaten fresh off the grill with a simple sauce or marinade. Slightly smaller than king but more available, coho or silver salmon offer excellent quality and flavor for a lower price than king.

Sockeye or red salmon are famous for their red flesh, affordability, and health benefits. Marsh suggests trying sockeye as sashimi, poke, or gravlax so you can really enjoy their great flavor and avoid overcooking.

Keta or chum salmon are best known for their delicious roe, but the lower oil content in the fillet makes them a perfect candidate for marinating. Pink or humpy salmon are slightly milder than the rest, making them a healthy source of protein to round out a salad or dip.

With their wide variety, quality, and recipe potential, it’s easy to see why Alaskans are so in love with salmon and eager to share them with cooks across the country.

Read more from Marsh’s interview with Feast and Field.

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